1965 Pontiac GTO Convertible 389 2n1 1/25 Scale Model Kit Build Review and Weathering AMT1191 AMT




AMT’s 1965 #Pontiac #GTO #389 #convertible #scalemodel is a hit!
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• A CLASSIC KIT FOR EXPERIENCED MODELERS: AMT’s 1/25 scale 1965 Pontiac GTO is a great project for any experienced classic-ride modeler who likes options. Add it to your collection today!

• FEATURE PACKED: The 1965 GTO kit is a pillar of the muscle car community! Fully paintable, it features a colorful sheet of detailed water-slide decals loaded with great classic options. Build this 2 in 1 as a hardtop or convertible. Features include: stock and custom engine parts, stock and custom roofs, pad printed redline and Goodyear tires, stock and custom wheels, and more. Wrapped up nicely in NEW, vintage-styled packaging!

• QUICK SPECS: 1/25 Scale, 90 Parts, 8 Inches long once assembled. Parts molded in white, transparent red and clear, with black vinyl tires. Some parts are chrome plated. Paint and glue required. Paint guide included in kit. For ages 10+

The Pontiac GTO is an automobile that was manufactured by American automobile manufacturer Pontiac from the 1964 to 1974 model years, and by GM’s subsidiary Holden in Australia from the 2004 to 2006 model years.

The first generation of the GTO was the first muscle car produced in the 1960s and the 1970s. [1][2] the Pontiac GTO is considered by some to have started the trend with all four domestic automakers offering a variety of competing models.[3][4]

For the 1964 and 1965 model years, the GTO was an optional package on the intermediate-sized Pontiac LeMans. The 1964 GTO vehicle identification number (VIN) started with 82, while the 1965 GTO VIN started with 237. The GTO became a separate model from 1966 to 1971 (VIN 242…). It became an optional package again for the 1972 and 1973 intermediate LeMans. For 1974, the GTO optional package was offered on the compact-sized Ventura.

The GTO was selected as the Motor Trend Car of the Year in 1968.

The GTO model was revived from 2004 to 2006 model years as a captive import for Pontiac, a left-hand drive version of the Holden Monaro, itself a coupé variant of the Holden Commodore.

In early 1963, General Motors’ management banned divisions from involvement in auto racing. This followed the 1957 voluntary ban on automobile racing that was instituted by the Automobile Manufacturers Association.[5] By the early 1960s, Pontiac’s advertising and marketing approach was heavily based on performance. With GM’s ban on factory-sponsored racing, Pontiac’s managers began to emphasize street performance.

In his autobiography Glory Days, Pontiac chief marketing manager Jim Wangers, who worked for the division’s contract advertising and public relations agency, states that John DeLorean, Bill Collins, and Russ Gee were responsible for the GTO’s creation. It involved transforming the upcoming second-generation Pontiac Tempest (which reverted to a conventional front-engine with front transmission configuration) into a sporty car, with a larger 389 cu in (6.4 L) Pontiac V8 engine from the full-sized Pontiac Catalina and Bonneville in place of the standard 326 cu in (5.3 L) V8. By promoting the big-engine option as a special high-performance model, they could appeal to the speed-minded youth market.

The GTO disregarded GM’s policy limiting the A-body intermediate line to a maximum engine displacement of 330 cu in (5.4 L). But the development team discovered a loophole in the policy which does not restrict large engines to be offered as an option.

The name, which was DeLorean’s idea, was inspired by the Ferrari 250 GTO, the successful race car. It is an Italian abbreviation for Gran Turismo Omologato.

The 389 cubic inches engines received revised cylinder heads with re-cored intake passages and high rise intake manifolds, improving airflow to the engine. Rated power increased to 335 hp (250 kW) at 5,000 rpm for the base four-barrel engine; the Tri-Power engine was now rated 360 hp (270 kW) at 5,200 rpm. The ‘S’-cammed Tri-Power engine had slightly less peak torque rating than the base engine 424 lb⋅ft (575 N⋅m) at 3,600 rpm as compared to 431 lb⋅ft (584 N⋅m) at 3,200 rpm. Transmission and axle ratio choices remained the same. The three-speed manual was standard, while two four-speed manual transmissions (wide or close ratio) and a two-speed automatic transmission were optional.

The restyled car had a new simulated hood scoop. A seldom seen dealer-installed option consisted of a metal underhood pan and gaskets to open the scoop, making it a cold air intake. The scoop was low enough that its effectiveness was questionable (it was unlikely to pick up anything but boundary layer air), but it allowed an enhanced engine sound. Another exterior change was the black “egg-crate” grille.

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